You Are the Best Hook That’s Ever Been Mine (Iris Stitch Version)

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Welcome to the third month of the Eras Crochet Along! The Amethyst Era brings us all things purple! It also happens to be my absolute favorite color. I had fun choosing from all the gorgeous purple yarns out there. I do wish that Bernat had a deeper purple color of blanket yarn for me to use, but I still love the Shadow Purple for it since it’s similar to one of the vinyl shades. If I remember it correctly after all these days, they did sell a nice, darker purple version but it’s long gone.

So did any of you find the hidden easter egg in last month’s post? No one in the group mentioned it. I added a purple iris flower in the top left corner of the photo showing the balls of yarn under Materials & Tools. Was that too, too hard to find? I hope you have better luck finding this month’s hidden clues for next month’s stitch! Don’t get lost upstate looking for clues…

For this era, I was clearly influenced by all the purple when it came to yarn selection. As for the stitch, I bounced around a couple of ideas based off of Enchanted and Sparks Fly, but ultimately I wanted a pretty stitch. Then I thought about pretty things that are purple and easily landed on the iris stitch. Iris flowers are absolutely beautiful, just like our favorite songstress and the stitch is just so darn appealing, I couldn’t resist. Oops, I didn’t mean to go on a 10-minute diatribe about pretty purple flowers.

It’s time now to grab your hook & yarn and get started! Don’t forget to share your finished blocks in our Eras Crochet Along Facebook group! I really enjoy seeing all of the different versions and yarn choices you make!

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You Are the Best Hook That’s Ever Been Mine
(Iris Stitch Version)

Difficulty

Intermediate

Materials

(Click the product links below to find your materials!)

Tools

Measurements

The finished block will measure approximately 6″ by 48″ with the blanket yarn.
It will measure approximately the same using two strands of #4 medium-weight yarn. You may need to use a 10.00 mm hook if your crochet tension is tighter or a smaller hook if your tension is loose. The primary goal is for your blocks to be close in size to each other for joining.

Gauge

2 full iris stitches = approximately 4 inches
4 rows of iris stitches = approximately 3.5 inches

Special Stitches

Iris Stitch:
2 double crochets, chain 1, 2 double crochets. Each row of iris stitches is added to the centers of the iris stitches on the previous row.

Instructions

Chain 109.

Row 1: Single crochet into the 2nd chain from the hook. Single crochet into each chain across. (108 single crochets)
Chain 2, turn.

Row 2: Chain 2 counts as the 1st double crochet stitch. Double crochet in the next stitch (beginners, see note #.) Skip 1 stitch. Double crochet twice in the same stitch, chain 1, double crochet twice in the next stitch. Skip 2 stitches. *Double crochet twice in the next stitch, chain 1, double crochet twice in the next stitch. Skip 2 stitches.** Repeat * to ** across 25 more times. This creates the iris stitch foundation row. For the last iris stitch repeat, only skip 1 stitch instead of 2. Double crochet into each of the last 2 stitches. (26 foundation iris stitches)
Chain 2, turn.

#NOTE: It will be tempting to put that very first double crochet of the row into the base of that chain 2, but don’t do it. It will throw off your count and make your edges wonky.

Row 3: Chain 2 counts as the 1st double crochet stitch. Double crochet into the next stitch. In the center of the 1st iris stitch chain 1 space (between 2 pairs of double crochets) from the previous row, add 2 double crochets, chain 1, then another 2 double crochets in the same space. This is the iris stitch (2 double crochets, chain 1, 2 double crochets.) Repeat the iris stitch across 25 more times. For the last iris stitch repeat, only skip 1 stitch instead of 2. Double crochet into each of the last 2 stitches. (26 iris stitches)
Chain 2, turn.

Row 4: Chain 2 counts as the 1st double crochet stitch. Double crochet into the next stitch. In the center of the 1st iris stitch chain 1 space (between 2 pairs of double crochets) from the previous row, add 2 double crochets, chain 1, then another 2 double crochets in the same space. Repeat the iris stitch across 25 more times. For the last iris stitch repeat, only skip 1 stitch instead of 2. Double crochet into each of the last 2 stitches. (26 iris stitches)
Chain 2, turn.

Row 5: Chain 2 counts as the 1st double crochet stitch. Double crochet into the next stitch. In the center of the 1st iris stitch chain 1 space (between 2 pairs of double crochets) from the previous row, add 2 double crochets, chain 1, then another 2 double crochets in the same space. Repeat the iris stitch across 25 more times. For the last iris stitch repeat, only skip 1 stitch instead of 2. Double crochet into each of the last 2 stitches. (26 iris stitches)
Chain 2, turn.

Row 6: Chain 2 counts as the 1st double crochet stitch. Double crochet into the next stitch. Half double crochet in the next stitch. *Single crochet in the next stitch. Skip the chain stitch. Single crochet in the next stitch. Chain 2, skip 2 stitches.** Repeat * to ** across. (In simpler terms, add 2 single crochets to the center 2 double crochets of each iris stitch, then chain 2. You’ll skip all the other stitches.)
Finish the last 3 stitches with 1 half double crochet, 1 double crochet, and 1 more final double crochet.
Chain 1, turn.

Row 7: Single crochet into the 1st stitch and the next 4 stitches. *Add 2 single crochets to the chain space. Single crochet in the next 2 stitches. * Repeat * to ** across. After the last chain space, single crochet into the last 5 stitches to finish the row. Make sure you have 108 single crochet stitches before you cut, tie off, and weave in your ends.

Cut, tie off, and weave in ends.

NOTE: This stitch tends to be pretty loose and therefore might end up longer than your other blocks, so watch your tension and make sure the double crochets that join the iris stitches don’t have large loops on your hook. Definitely stop and check your width gauge on row 3 before you get too far along. I know, no one likes to check gauge, but it can save you from loads of frogging.


So what do you think? Did my instructions get lost in translation? Is your block a masterpiece or do you want to crumple it up like a piece of paper? Well, you can’t get rid of it because you’ll need it to finish the whole blanket, lol.

Would you classify this stitch as beginner or intermediate? I know it’s just double crochets and chains for the most part but it’s easy to miscount or skip stitches, so always count your stitches at the end of each row. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me or the group if you need any help!

I can’t wait to see your version of the block!

Have You Seen the Other Eras Crochet Along Blocks?
Sea Green Era: Just Another Pattern to Burn
Golden Era: Romeo, Take Me Somewhere We Can Buy Some Yarn
Amethyst Era: You Are the Best Hook That’s Ever Been Mine ⇦ You Are Here

Thanks for stopping by!
Please let me know if you have any questions or need help with your block!
See you next month!
– Marie

2 thoughts on “You Are the Best Hook That’s Ever Been Mine (Iris Stitch Version)”

  1. For some reason, it doesn’t matter how many time I have crocheted row 2 I keep ending up with 27 foundation iris stitches.

    Is the PDF available for purchase, if so can you please send me the link

    1. Hi Debi, the printable pattern is now available in my shop.
      For row 2, it starts with 3 stitches, the chain 2 (counts as double), the double, and 1 skipped stitch. The row ends with those same 3 stitches in reverse, 1 skipped stitch, then 2 doubles. That’s 6 of the 108 stitches.
      For this iris stitch foundation row, each iris uses 2 stitches and then skips 2 stitches (except for at the beginning and end of the row where we have those 1 skipped stitches.) So 26 iris stitches use 52 stitches and the 2 skipped stitches x25 is 50 stitches. 6+52+50=108. I suggest making sure you have 108 single crochets on row 1 and if you do, then count your stitches on row 2 to make sure you’ve skipped only 2 in between the irises.
      Please let me know if that didn’t help and I can troubleshoot it with you some more.

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